Buyer Beware

Thank you for considering this wonderful breed, the Havanese. A Havanese could live for 14 – 15 years or more, so this is a big investment of your time and your affection.

A dog is a big investment of your time, your love and a financial commitment to buy as well as to take care of. Use your common sense and ask questions. Often breeders will require an application or questionnaire to see if the dog is a good fit for your life and for your family. Is someone home a lot? These little dogs are very devoted to their owners and become very lonely without human or doggy companionship.

The following may be helpful.

KNOW THE BREEDER:

· Some ways to do this, if you live close: go visit the breeder

· A reputable breeder is usually active in the breed and wants the best interest of the breed.

· A good breeder should be available and interested in answering your questions before and after the sale of the pup. They may also refer you to some books or printed material. The breeder may require a signed contract with a right of first refusal if the dog is re-homed for any reason (placed in another home).

· Look at the pedigree and registry of the puppy or dog. Check registry of parents. If you are not sure, ask to see registration documents for both parents. The recognized registries for Havanese in Australia are the Australian Kennel Club and associated member organisations including DOGS NSW, DOGS ACT, DOGS Vic, DOGS SA, DOGS West, DOGS NT, DOGS Queensland and DOGS Tasmania.

· Ask about DNA (genetic profiling) which confirms parentage and pedigree of the puppy, as well as the integrity of the breed.

· Ask about health testing. A reputable breeder who is interested in the future of their breed will health test their dogs. 

· Do not buy from a pet store. Well meaning people buy from pet stores, as pet stores usually advise they buy from reputable breeders. Be assured, a GOOD BREEDER will not sell a puppy anywhere without knowing exactly where the puppy is going and to whom. 

· Be sure you are buying a Havanese and not a poodle mix from a puppy mill that is being advertised as a Havanese.

· Do not buy from a puppy mill, where dogs are kept in small crates or cages and are breed continuously. Ask how many dogs the kennel owner has, and what breeds.

· Beware of ads in the paper or on-line for Havanese or cross-breed Havanese for $250 or $300. At the present time, you could expect to pay $1500 to $2000 (AUS) for one Havanese puppy, from a reputable breeder, with the required papers.

· Exercise caution. Often there are waiting lists for Havanese. A reputable breeder will hold on to puppies as long as it takes to place them in the right homes and may not have a puppy suitable to your situation, even though they have puppies available.

· Age of placement. Some breeders of toy breeds, such as the Havanese, prefer to wait until the puppy is 10 or 12 weeks to release the puppy.

· Vaccination: Prior to placement puppies should have been vaccinated. First vaccination, at the minimum.

· Microchip: In most states (in Australia) it is the law for puppies to be micro chipped before 12 weeks of age and prior to sale or transfer.

· Look for a nice, healthy puppy. Preferably one with a written health check from a veterinarian.

· Obtain a receipt for deposit and for payment made.

· Look for a suitable  temperament and fit for your lifestyle and family. When you contact a breeder you will have many questions. A  GOOD breeder will be happy to answer your questions. However, a good breeder will also ask you questions. Do not be offended by this.  They are trying to decide if you have realistic expectations about the Havanese breed, your ideas about owning a dog and which personality would suit you best.

· Breeder regulations state that the registered breeder must register the litter and give you an individual dog or puppy registration. To transfer the puppy into your name , you should send in the registration with the registration fee to the registry in your state. Some reputable breeders pay this fee and do this on your behalf.

· Ask what type of dog food the puppy is on – do not change too quickly. Check with your vet if you have questions.

· A reputable breeder will provide information on puppy care and provide support for ongoing care.

 

FINANCIAL COMMON SENSE:

· Do not give your credit card to someone you do not know or do not trust.

· Be sure you are buying a Havanese and not a poodle mix from a puppy mill that is being advertised as a Havanese.

· Check and verify all information.

· Too-good-to-be-true prices for pedigree pups call for caution.

· If you are unsure about an ad that you have seen, seek advice from a registered breeder or kennel association or a vet

 

TRANSPORTATION AND DOCUMENTATION:

· To transport a Havanese by air within Australia will cost at least $100 - $300. Ask if transport is in addition to the price and have a written total showing details. You may want to fly and pick up your puppy at the airport near your breeder.

· Vaccination - When you buy, you should receive vaccination documents showing the date the puppy had a vet check, a list of shots received and dates of same. If not, do not buy the puppy.

· Microchip - You should receive microchip papers. In most states (in Australia) it is the law for puppies to be micro chipped before 12 weeks of age and prior to sale or transfer.

· Pedigree - You will receive pedigree registration form. This shows the parentage of the puppy. These papers will come from a recognised registry. The recognized registries for Havanese in Australia are the Australian Kennel Club and associated member organisations including DOGS NSW, DOGS ACT, DOGS Vic, DOGS SA, DOGS West, DOGS NT, DOGS Queensland and DOGS Tasmania.

· Registration is important to maintain the integrity of the Havanese breed and to keep track of the location and numbers of the breed.

· You will receive a receipt of purchase.

 

PEDIGREE PURBRED V'S DESIGNER DOG 

Please refer to the following link for details on pedigree v's hybrid cross bred dogs:

  http://www.dogzonline.com.au/pedigree_dogs.asp 

 

WHAT SHOULD I FEED MY DOG?

Be aware of what you feed your dog/puppy.  You spend time sourcing the perfect breed, then spend hours finding the right breeder to purchase your puppy from. You should also spend time on what  to feed your puppy or adult dog, to ensure a long life free from avoidable illness.

The pet food industry is not ‘closely’ regulated, and in my opinion manufactured dog foods may lead to unexpected health issues in dogs; itchy skin, itchy ears , there have even reports of death. It would be wise for you to do your own appropriate research and study which companies make pet food, what the ingredients are in the food or treats (not just what is written on the packet) and regulations that govern the production and distribution of pet food.  Then make up your own mind on what is best for your dog/puppy.   

Did you know that many pet foods are made by confectionary companies? The Australian dog food industry is essentially covered by two main companies - MARS and Nestle (USA based Lolly manufacturers).

You have spent a lot of time and money to obtain your dog, feed it well to ensure your dog/puppy has a long happy healthy life.

 

 

Note: The above information is to be used as a guide when purchasing a Havanese puppy. Please make your own  further enquiries to ensure you receive a Havanese suitable for your situation. 

 

 

 

 


Contact Details

M Newhouse
Sydney/Wollongong, NSW, Australia
Phone : 0402 332 332